cerulean tulips



Reblogged from nprmusic

nprmusic:

You ever look back on your life and wonder, “What did I ever do?” And then you watch a bunch of teenagers nail Porgy and Bess┐(・。・┐) ♪

(via npr)

Reblogged from nprmusic
nprmusic:

Watch the R&B singer Mali Music perform with unabashed positivity and an uplifting spirit at NPR’s Tiny Desk. 

nprmusic:

Watch the R&B singer Mali Music perform with unabashed positivity and an uplifting spirit at NPR’s Tiny Desk

(via npr)

Reblogged from yagazieemezi

When I’m upset… I turn to Harper Lee…

Reblogged from skunkbear

skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)

You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.

(via npr)

Reblogged from nprglobalhealth
nprglobalhealth:

She’s Got A Perfect Afro — And A Melodious Vision For African Musicians
In February, Ethiopian-born singer Meklit Hadero was flying home from Uganda to the U.S. when her plane had to land unexpectedly near the Arctic Circle. It was so cold that to keep her fingers warm she put on oven mitts (decorated with an African print) that she’d bought to bring home.
A fellow passenger introduced himself: Leelai Demoz, he’s Ethiopian, too. He’d just finished co-producing Difret, a movie based on the true story of a 14-year-old Ethiopian girl abducted by a man who wanted to marry her; the girl shot him and was tried for murder.
Hadero and Demoz hung out, hoped to see the Northern Lights (no luck, it was foggy). By coincidence, a few weeks later, Hadero got a call from Lincoln Center to see if she’d sing at a screening of Difret.
So it’s a small world for global artists.
And that’s especially true for African musicians who’ve come to the West. They can get together and mix it up in diaspora more readily than on the continent, says Hadero, who left Ethiopia as a toddler in 1981 and now lives in the Bay Area. “There are 437 million people in the Nile Basin. There are all sorts of political tensions around how we share water,” she says. “There are barriers to getting to know each other. There’s not a lot of access.”
Her solution was to co-found the Nile Project, along with Egyptian ethnomusicologist Mina Girgis. They invite musicians from the 10 countries along the Nile River to play together and record an album. She was returning from a three-weeks session in Kampala, Uganda, when she had her Arctic detour.
Back home, Hadero talked about her music, how the Nile Project has changed it — and what it’s like to be compared to Joni Mitchell. This interview has been edited for length and clarity.
Did you contribute any songs to the movie?
No, but I wrote a song for the [concert]. It doesn’t have a name yet. It’s about the strength and resilience of women and what happens when a personal story becomes a way for a whole country to move forward around a particular issue. The story of the film is how [this practice of abducting a bride] became illegal.
Your new album, We Are Alive, draws from Ethiopia as well — you sing “Kemekem,” an Ethiopian folk song.
Kemekem is a slang term in Amharic for freshly mown grass. It’s applied to an afro that has been perfectly cut and coiffed. “Kemekem” is a love song sung to a person with a perfect afro. The lyrics are very cute: “You live at the top of the hill, I live at the bottom. Just roll on down and meet me at the bottom.”
Continue reading.
Photo: Ethiopian-born singer Meklit Hadero shows off her guitar chops and her perfect afro. (Cody Pickens)

nprglobalhealth:

She’s Got A Perfect Afro — And A Melodious Vision For African Musicians

In February, Ethiopian-born singer Meklit Hadero was flying home from Uganda to the U.S. when her plane had to land unexpectedly near the Arctic Circle. It was so cold that to keep her fingers warm she put on oven mitts (decorated with an African print) that she’d bought to bring home.

A fellow passenger introduced himself: Leelai Demoz, he’s Ethiopian, too. He’d just finished co-producing Difret, a movie based on the true story of a 14-year-old Ethiopian girl abducted by a man who wanted to marry her; the girl shot him and was tried for murder.

Hadero and Demoz hung out, hoped to see the Northern Lights (no luck, it was foggy). By coincidence, a few weeks later, Hadero got a call from Lincoln Center to see if she’d sing at a screening of Difret.

So it’s a small world for global artists.

And that’s especially true for African musicians who’ve come to the West. They can get together and mix it up in diaspora more readily than on the continent, says Hadero, who left Ethiopia as a toddler in 1981 and now lives in the Bay Area. “There are 437 million people in the Nile Basin. There are all sorts of political tensions around how we share water,” she says. “There are barriers to getting to know each other. There’s not a lot of access.”

Her solution was to co-found the Nile Project, along with Egyptian ethnomusicologist Mina Girgis. They invite musicians from the 10 countries along the Nile River to play together and record an album. She was returning from a three-weeks session in Kampala, Uganda, when she had her Arctic detour.

Back home, Hadero talked about her music, how the Nile Project has changed it — and what it’s like to be compared to Joni Mitchell. This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Did you contribute any songs to the movie?

No, but I wrote a song for the [concert]. It doesn’t have a name yet. It’s about the strength and resilience of women and what happens when a personal story becomes a way for a whole country to move forward around a particular issue. The story of the film is how [this practice of abducting a bride] became illegal.

Your new album, We Are Alive, draws from Ethiopia as well — you sing “Kemekem,” an Ethiopian folk song.

Kemekem is a slang term in Amharic for freshly mown grass. It’s applied to an afro that has been perfectly cut and coiffed. “Kemekem” is a love song sung to a person with a perfect afro. The lyrics are very cute: “You live at the top of the hill, I live at the bottom. Just roll on down and meet me at the bottom.”

Continue reading.

Photo: Ethiopian-born singer Meklit Hadero shows off her guitar chops and her perfect afro. (Cody Pickens)

Reblogged from powells
powells:

Happy birthday to Hunter S. Thompson, who would be 77 today: http://powells.us/1qL2pKK

powells:

Happy birthday to Hunter S. Thompson, who would be 77 today: http://powells.us/1qL2pKK

Reblogged from wocinsolidarity

wocinsolidarity:

Attanya: #WeNeedDiverseBooks because I love science fiction and fantasy books, but I’m tired of authors treating dragons and robots and magic as more plausible than black and brown characters

Jennifer: #WeNeedDiverseBooks because… when I was 13 a white girl told me it was selfishthat all of the protagonists in my stories were Latina because she “just can’t relate to nonwhite characters.” She made me feel guilty for writing about people like me. 

Aiesha: #WeNeedDiverseBooks because…Black Girls are more than sidekicks or “sassy, ghetto friend”

Facts and Figures About Race/Ethnicity in YA and Children’s Lit:

#WENEEDDIVERSEBOOKS

Posting this a little late, but followers please take the time out to check out this post explaining the #WeNeedDiverseBooks campaign and more events to come over the next few days! 

(via upworthy)

Reblogged from nprbooks
nprbooks:

Image via the New Yorker
This is just makes me horrified and delighted in equal measure: The good folks at the New Yorker have given us an update on Eloise, now 46 and living at the Crowne Plaza:

There is a lobby with purple lights and silver-and-gold confetti things hanging from the ceilingYou can find videos of the elevators on YouTube

The absolute first thing I do in the morning is make coffee in the bathroom and check to see what’s on pay-per-viewThen I have to go to the health club to see if they’ve gotten any new kettlebells and then stop at the business center to Google a few foreign swear words
Cheryl is the daytime conciergeShe knows people who have appeared on at least three of the “Real Housewives” seriesShe is very good at recommending bus tours and pointing out where the coffee-to-go island is
Every morning, I go out to Times Square and see what kinds of discounts they’re offering on show tickets, and whether there are any new colors of M&M’sAnd then I follow Elmo around for a while, to see if I can catch him smoking or saying any bad words


The actual Eloise would be, what, closer to 60 now, I think? Her illustrator, Hilary Knight (who also did the Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle books!) is still alive and gave this charmingly pointed interview to the Daily Beast a few years back. Pertinent quote? “You’d never see Eloise with a cellphone. Not in my lifetime. The worst thing she could do would be watch television. She is too interested in what’s going on in the outside world.”
(Bonus: When Knight found out that Girls creator Lena Dunham had an Eloise tattoo on her backside, he visited the set and made a little sketch gallery.)
— Petra
p.s. If you haven’t read the Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle books, go do it right now. And then read creator Betty MacDonald’s amazing series of autobiographies, beginning with The Egg and I, about which a whole ‘nother post could be composed.

nprbooks:

Image via the New Yorker

This is just makes me horrified and delighted in equal measure: The good folks at the New Yorker have given us an update on Eloise, now 46 and living at the Crowne Plaza:

There is a lobby with purple lights and silver-and-gold confetti things hanging from the ceiling
You can find videos of the elevators on YouTube

The absolute first thing I do in the morning is make coffee in the bathroom and check to see what’s on pay-per-view
Then I have to go to the health club to see if they’ve gotten any new kettlebells and then stop at the business center to Google a few foreign swear words

Cheryl is the daytime concierge
She knows people who have appeared on at least three of the “Real Housewives” series
She is very good at recommending bus tours and pointing out where the coffee-to-go island is

Every morning, I go out to Times Square and see what kinds of discounts they’re offering on show tickets, and whether there are any new colors of M&M’s
And then I follow Elmo around for a while, to see if I can catch him smoking or saying any bad words

The actual Eloise would be, what, closer to 60 now, I think? Her illustrator, Hilary Knight (who also did the Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle books!) is still alive and gave this charmingly pointed interview to the Daily Beast a few years back. Pertinent quote? “You’d never see Eloise with a cellphone. Not in my lifetime. The worst thing she could do would be watch television. She is too interested in what’s going on in the outside world.

(Bonus: When Knight found out that Girls creator Lena Dunham had an Eloise tattoo on her backside, he visited the set and made a little sketch gallery.)

— Petra

p.s. If you haven’t read the Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle books, go do it right now. And then read creator Betty MacDonald’s amazing series of autobiographies, beginning with The Egg and I, about which a whole ‘nother post could be composed.

Reblogged from shepherdsongs
clitterly:

emilyvgordon:

shepherdsongs:

I was driving past a business here in the Houston Heights, when I glimpsed this painted on the side of the building. I recognized that iconic WWII poster before I realized it was not just any woman, but 14 year old Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani girl who was attacked for wanting an education. The words next to her are her quote, ( “I don’t mind if I have to sit on the floor at school.) All I want is education. And I’m afraid of no one.”

This is gorgeous.

yes

clitterly:

emilyvgordon:

shepherdsongs:

I was driving past a business here in the Houston Heights, when I glimpsed this painted on the side of the building. I recognized that iconic WWII poster before I realized it was not just any woman, but 14 year old Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani girl who was attacked for wanting an education. The words next to her are her quote, ( “I don’t mind if I have to sit on the floor at school.) All I want is education. And I’m afraid of no one.”

This is gorgeous.

yes

(via upworthy)